art-of-swords:

Mamluk Knife with Decorated Scabbard

  • Dated: 14th - 16th century 
  • Measurements: overall length 21.5 cm; blade length 11 cm

The blade is made of watered steel decorated with three embedded coral beads and the inscription "The time of the reign of Sultan Malik Zahir". On the reverse of the blade reads, "Fly high, bird of distress and revenge, your rigor and fairness affirm human fate".

The knife has a square tapered handle of blue glass. The ivory scabbard is richly inlaid with mother of pearl, brass and stones, representing the heavens, with gilt silver fittings with garnets and turquoise.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Galerie Arcimboldo

FINALLY. Geez, this is like pulling teeth.
Only four more chapters to comb through after this.

And then editing….

caseyanthonyofficial:

omgbuglen:

Save the Bees!

We don’t negotiate with terrorists

caseyanthonyofficial:

omgbuglen:

Save the Bees!

We don’t negotiate with terrorists

bumbleswag:

image

that’s it. that’s the whole series.

A message from snowysauropteryx


I just downloaded the PDF this morning, it's beautiful! I especially like the extra scene with Toma. I have a somewhat gross question about the pre-chapter illustration where the gulls are trying to fly away with Duane's hand, though. [Sorry, I'm just really curious about how Duane keeps himself together.] Are those hooks in his wrist? Are there latches on the end of his ulna and radius?

glassshard:

Glad you liked the PDF :) I’m doing the bonus comic now, it’s coming together well, I think~~

Indeed, Duane hooks himself together like a science classroom skeleton. His nature seems to keep him mobile as long as what he needs is in place (and human). If his hands stay on the ends of his arms they’ll function to the extent of their natural mobility. His legs require more robust hardware so they can support his weight but his left foot is all wired at the moment, and as the tendons in Turas’ foot rot through he’ll have to wire those as well. Duane is seldom bored.

anniezard:

thisisworse:

Based on what Javik allegedly says (I haven’t downloaded the DLC, probably won’t) when he says Protheans considered Quarians attractive in their cycle, my immediate inclination was that they looked very Prothean-esque.
So yeah, this. Fantastic.
[Take that, Talimancers]

I caught that when watching my fiance’s playthrough! Put simply, this concept is sodding fantastic.

anniezard:

thisisworse:

Based on what Javik allegedly says (I haven’t downloaded the DLC, probably won’t) when he says Protheans considered Quarians attractive in their cycle, my immediate inclination was that they looked very Prothean-esque.

So yeah, this. Fantastic.

[Take that, Talimancers]

I caught that when watching my fiance’s playthrough! Put simply, this concept is sodding fantastic.

thedsgnblog:

Daniel Siim    |    http://danielsiim.dk

"Digital books are at a rapid growth and currently make up 20 percent of all books sold to the general public in the US alone. As the digital market is expanding, the need for analogue books is becoming more redundant. The redesign of the prodigious novel Star Maker, by William Olaf Stapledon, first published in 1937, serves as an experiment on highlighting the qualities of a book’s physical existence, some of which cannot be accommodated by an e-book. 

This project is a comprehensive study of paper material, text layout and physical size. The book features various paper goods and weights along with a bookcase containing 16 A5-sized artworks representing a visual interpretation of each chapter, and a square-sized constellation map of the books content.” 

Daniel Siim is a Copenhagen-based designer and a BA graduate from The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation. His practice approach a wide scale of graphic design with a focus on printed matter, from small press to major publishing.

The Design Blog:  facebook  |  twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe

goddamnitriot:

You can not write the word “ignorance”. The future is on sale.

Push aside and laugh at the karmic tale saying it’s superstition.

the “glitchy” part in the beginning is why i’m alive